National Forum 2022

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Please join us for three days of knowledge sharing and learning as we explore how families and communities honor and nurture cultural, ethnic, and racial identities for child flourishing.

This year’s Forum is virtual. Each day begins with a unique plenary presentation, followed by two 90-minute workshops with three concurrent choices. Each of the six workshop topics is repeated across the three days so that participants can experience all six. You can register to attend all three days, or select the days that most interest you.

Select the Agenda tab above to view the full agenda. Select the Plenary Speakers tab to view the full speaker bios. Select the Workshops tab to view the workshop descriptions and facilitators.

T. Berry Brazelton Award Ceremony

Please join us on Wednesday, March 30, at 5 PM ET / 2 PM PT to remember T. Berry Brazelton and to honor this year’s awardee. All National Forum participants are invited to this special event. 

All sessions will have live Spanish translation and closed captioning available.

Plenary Presentations

Tuesday, March 29 – Listening to Our Ancestors and the Earth: Indigenous Connectedness for Child and Collective Wellbeing

Presenter:

Jessica Saniġaq Ullrich, MSW, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Alaska Anchorage School of Social Work, Descendant of Kiŋiġin (Native Village of Wales)

Wednesday, March 30 – Immigration from Abroad: Fostering Children’s Cultural Fluency and Pride

Presenter:
Cynthia Garcia Coll

Cynthia Garcia Coll, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Science Campus; Charles Pitts Robinson and John Palmer Barstow Professor Emerita, Brown University; Editor, Child Development in Cultural Context, Oxford University Press

Thursday, March 31 – “I would tell them to stand up for their rights”: How Parents Foster Racial Pride and Resistance in African American Children

Presenter: Dr. Kerry-Ann Escayg

Kerry-Ann Escayg, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education, College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Registration Fees:
Early Bird Registration Fee, by March 4:Regular Registration Fee:
Full forum (3 days) – $250Full forum (3 days) – $270
2 days – $1652 days – $180
1 day – $851 day – $90

Additional Information:

BTC Learning Network members save 10% on their registration fee! (Click here to learn how to join the BTC Learning Network.)

Can’t attend a live session? Register today and receive access to your paid session recording for 30 days following the event.

Groups of 10 or more participants receive a 10% discount! Please use the online registration form if you are paying by credit card. If you need to pay by invoice or purchase order, email touchpoints@childrens.harvard.edu.

Can’t attend this year? Please consider making a donation to help someone else attend. This event is only possible through the generosity of people like you.

Cancellation Policy: We recognize that the uncertainties of life can sometimes derail our plans. That is why all Forum registrants will receive access to their paid session recordings for 30 days after the event. If you need to cancel your registration, we can accept cancellations up to 14 days before the Forum’s start (on or before March 15). You will receive a full refund, minus a 10% processing fee. After March 15, we are unable to offer refunds. Please email us with questions.

Questions? Email touchpoints@childrens.harvard.edu

Tuesday, March 29, 2022; 11 AM to 4:30 PM ET / 8 AM to 1:30 PM PT

Plenary Presentation – Listening to Our Ancestors and the Earth: Indigenous Connectedness for Child and Collective Wellbeing

Presenter:

Jessica Saniġaq Ullrich, MSW, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Alaska Anchorage School of Social Work, Descendant of Kiŋiġin (Native Village of Wales)

Using the results of a research study that involved 25 Alaska Native knowledge bearers of the Alaska child welfare system, Professor Saniġaq Ullrich updated an Indigenous Connectedness Framework that shows how Indigenous child wellbeing is reliant on connectedness to self, family, community, the environment, ancestors/future generations, and culture/spirit. In her talk, she will share three fundamental recommendations that emerge from this framework, and how implementing these recommendations can lead to better public health outcomes, not only for Alaska Native and other Indigenous peoples but for us all.

Agenda:
11:00 AM - 11:15 AM ET / 8:00 - 8:15 AM PT  Opening Welcome
  • Joshua Sparrow, MD
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM ET / 8:15 AM - 9:30 AM PT  Plenary: Listening to Our Ancestors and the Earth:     Indigenous Connectedness for Child and Collective Wellbeing
    • Jessica Saniġaq Ullrich, MSW, Ph.D.
12:30 PM - 1:00 PM ET / 9:30 AM - 10:00 AM PT  Break
1:00 PM - 2:30 PM ET / 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM PT  Workshops (Select the Workshops tab above to view workshop descriptions.)
    • Using a Relationship-based Care Model to Respond to Behaviors that Challenge
    • Creating Communities of Belonging for Staff: A Collaborative Problem-Solving Networking Opportunity
    • Community-Based Inquiry with the Indigenous Early Learning Collaborative
2:30 PM - 3:00 PM ET / 11:30 AM - 12:00 PM PT  Break
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM ET / 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM PT  Workshops (Select the Workshops tab above to view workshop descriptions.)
    • Developmental and Relational Belonging in Our Communities: Centering Racial Identities in Black Children and Families
    • Supporting Father Involvement and Co-Parenting Across All Kinds of Differences
    • Lifting Your Voice for Children: Strategies for Advocating for Policies in Support of Infants, Children and Families
4:30 PM ET / 1:30 PM PT  Adjourn

Wednesday March 30, 2022; 11 AM to 6 PM ET / 8 AM to 3 PM PT

Cynthia Garcia Coll

Plenary Presentation – Immigration from Abroad: Fostering Children’s Cultural Fluency and Pride

Presenter:

Cynthia Garcia Coll, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Puerto Rico, Medical Science Campus; Charles Pitts Robinson and John Palmer Barstow Professor Emerita, Brown University; Editor, Child Development in Cultural Context, Oxford University Press

In this talk, Professor Garcia Coll, who has pioneered groundbreaking research on children’s cultural identity development for several decades, will explain how cultural identity develops, why it matters, and how it can be fostered in children whose families have immigrated to the United States, in particular, from Latin America.

Agenda:
11:00 AM -11:15 AM ET / 8:00 AM - 8:15 AM PT  Opening Welcome
    • Eva Rivera, MSW
11:15 AM -12:30 PM ET / 8:15 AM - 9:30 AM PT  Plenary: Immigration from Abroad: Fostering Children’s Cultural Fluency and Pride
    • Cynthia Garcia Coll, Ph.D.
12:30 - 1:00 PM ET /           9:30 - 10:00 AM PT  Break
1:00 PM - 2:30 ET /         10:00 AM - 11:30 AM PT  Workshops (Select the Workshops tab above to view workshop descriptions.)
    • Using a Relationship-based Care Model to Respond to Behaviors that Challenge
    • Creating Communities of Belonging for Staff: A Collaborative Problem-Solving Networking Opportunity
    • Community-Based Inquiry with the Indigenous Early Learning Collaborative
2:30 PM - 3:00 PM ET /     11:30 AM - 12:00 PM PT  Break
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM ET /   12:30 - 2:00 PM PT  Workshops (Select the Workshops tab above to view workshop descriptions.)
  • Developmental and Relational Belonging in Our Communities: Centering Racial Identities in Black Children and Families
  • Supporting Father Involvement and Co-Parenting Across All Kinds of Differences
  • Lifting Your Voice for Children: Strategies for Advocating for Policies in Support of Infants, Children and Families
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM ET  /     1:30 PM - 2:00 PM PT  Break
5:00 PM ET / 2:00 PM PT  The T.B. Brazelton Award Ceremony

Thursday March 31, 2022; 11 AM to 5 PM ET / 8 AM to 2 PM PT

Dr. Kerry-Ann Escayg

Plenary Presentation – “I would tell them to stand up for their rights”: How Parents Foster Racial Pride and Resistance in African American Children

Presenter:

Kerry-Ann Escayg, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education, College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences, University of Nebraska at Omaha

An early childhood and anti-racism expert, Professor Escayg will unpack the research on racial identity development in African American children, and distill its applications for parents, teachers, and other adult nurturers who seek to promote children’s flourishing.

Agenda:
11:00 AM - 11:15 AM ET /    8:00 - 8:15 AM PT  Opening Welcome
    • Eurnestine Brown, Ph.D.
11:15 AM - 12:30 PM ET /  8:15 AM - 9:30 AM PT  Plenary: “I would tell them to stand up for their rights”: How Parents Foster Racial Pride and Resistance in African American Children
    • Kerry-Ann Escayg, Ph.D.
12:30 PM - 1:00 PM ET /    9:30 AM - 10:00 AM PT  Break
1:00 PM -2:30 PM ET /    10:00 AM - 11:30 AM PT  Workshops (Select the Workshops tab above to view workshop descriptions.)
    • Using a Relationship-based Care Model to Respond to Behaviors that Challenge
    • Creating Communities of Belonging for Staff: A Collaborative Problem-Solving Networking Opportunity
    • Community-Based Inquiry with the Indigenous Early Learning Collaborative
2:30 PM - 3:00 PM ET /    11:30 AM - 12:00 PM PT  Break
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM ET /     12:00 PM - 1:30 PM PT  Workshops (Select the Workshops tab above to view workshop descriptions.)
    • Developmental and Relational Belonging in Our Communities: Centering Racial Identities in Black Children and Families
    • Supporting Father Involvement and Co-Parenting Across All Kinds of Differences
    • Lifting Your Voice for Children: Strategies for Advocating for Policies in Support of Infants, Children and Families
4:30 PM - 5:00 PM ET /     1:30 PM - 2:00 PM PT Closing Remarks
5 PM ET / 2:00 PM PT  Adjourn

Tuesday, March 29 – Listening to Our Ancestors and the Earth: Indigenous Connectedness for Child and Collective Wellbeing

Jessica Saniġaq Ullrich, MSW, Ph.D., is an Inupiaq scholar, a tribal citizen of the Nome Eskimo Community, and a descendant of the Native Village of Wales. She also lives and works on the lands of the Dena'ina Peoples. As an Assistant Professor at the University of Alaska Anchorage in the School of Social Work, she focuses on the promotion of connectedness, wellbeing, and relational healing.

Dr. Saniġaq Ullrich is currently engaged in efforts that involve digital storytelling with Alaska Native youth, culturally-based curriculum development, tribal child welfare prevention efforts, language revitalization, and connectedness for systems change. Storytelling through research, education, and authorship are central to her work.

Wednesday, March 30 – Immigration from Abroad: Fostering Children’s Cultural Fluency and Pride

Cynthia Garcia CollCynthia García Coll, Ph.D., is the Charles Pitts Robinson and John Palmer Barstow Professor Emerita at Brown University and editor of Child Development in Cultural Context at Oxford University Press. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University and was the Associate Director of the Institutional Center for Scientific Research at Carlos Albizu University, located in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Currently, she is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Puerto Rico.

Dr. Garcia Coll studies how social and cultural factors influence child and adolescent development, focusing on at-risk and minority populations. Her expertise includes immigrant youths, ethnic minority children, and bilingualism. Her model placing discrimination and public policy at the forefront of shaping minority youth development is proving extremely relevant and timely.

Thursday, March 31 – “I would tell them to stand up for their rights”: How Parents Foster Racial Pride and Resistance in African American Children

Dr. Kerry-Ann EscaygKerry-Ann Escayg, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Education at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. As an anti-racist and anti-colonial scholar committed to fostering Pan-African unity and racial equity in the early years, Dr. Escayg—via both pedagogy and research—challenges racial and attendant economic injustices affecting Black children and families in the United States, Canada, and the Caribbean.

Dr. Escayg applies that dual-lens to the field of early childhood education, with the primary intent of bringing about institutional change for Black children and their families.

Using a Relationship-based Care Model to Respond to Behaviors that Challenge

How do you respond when you are faced with children’s behaviors that challenge you? This workshop will introduce the Behaviors that Challenge Course. Participants will learn about the importance of using a relationship-based care approach to address behavior. Participants will have an opportunity to practice course content by using an interactive simulation to respond to behaviors that challenge us.

In this session, we will highlight:

  • the importance of reflection and perspective-taking when addressing behaviors
  • the role that racism, bias, race, and gender play in response to behavior
  • how to engage with families in addressing behaviors
  • strategies that help providers to respond quickly and effectively to behaviors
    • This workshop is offered at the following times:

      • Tuesday, March 29, at 1:00 PM ET / 10:00 AM PT
      • Wednesday, March 30, at 1:00 PM ET / 10:00 AM PT
      • Thursday, March 31, at 1:00 PM ET / 10:00 AM PT

      Facilitators:

      • Jayne Singer, Ph.D., IECMH-E®, Clinical Psychologist, Boston Children’s Hospital; Director of Developmental and Relational Health, Brazelton Touchpoints Center
      • Dewana Thompson, Ph.D., Director, Touchpoints National Facilitator Team, Brazelton Touchpoints Center
      • Eva Rivera, MSW, Professional Development Program Manager and National Facilitator, Brazelton Touchpoints Center


      Creating Communities of Belonging for Staff: A Collaborative Problem-Solving Networking Opportunity

      Come join us for a facilitated opportunity to network with peers to hear strategies for addressing the current challenge of supporting staff morale. We will explore how to create work environments in this current climate where staff feel supported and that they belong.

      This workshop is offered at the following times:

      • Tuesday, March 29, at 1:00 PM ET / 10:00 AM PT
      • Wednesday, March 30, at 1:00 PM ET / 10:00 AM PT
      • Thursday, March 31, at 1:00 PM ET / 10:00 AM PT

      Facilitator:

      • Mindy May, MS, Director of Partnerships and Professional Development and National Facilitator, Brazelton Touchpoints Center
      • Lisa Desrochers, MEd, Professional Development Manager and National Facilitator, Brazelton Touchpoints Center


      Community-Based Inquiry with the Indigenous Early Learning Collaborative

      The Brazelton Touchpoints Center partners with the First Light Education Project to lead the Indigenous Early Learning Collaborative (IELC), a national initiative that supports early learning and development communities in implementing community-based inquiry projects. Participants will hear about projects from our four partner sites focused on developing an Indigenous early learning framework, implementing a land-based curriculum, envisioning Indigenous learning spaces and healing, and creating an Ojibwe learning series for providers. Our discussion will include how to begin your own community-based inquiry project. Please note: This workshop will not be recorded.

      This workshop is offered at the following times:

      • Tuesday, March 29, at 1:00 PM ET / 10:00 AM PT
      • Wednesday, March 30, at 1:00 PM ET / 10:00 AM PT
      • Thursday, March 31, at 1:00 PM ET / 10:00 AM PT

      Facilitators:

      • Tarajean Yazzie-Mintz, Ed.D., Founder and Principal Consultant, First Light Education Project Denver
      • Joelfre Grant, MAT, Assistant Director, Partnership and Professional Development, Brazelton Touchpoints Center


      Developmental and Relational Belonging in Our Communities: Centering Racial Identities in Black Children and Families

      Join in to discuss creative and relational strategies for centering and enriching the development of racial identities in Black children and families. Explore ways families, providers, and communities can create a sense of belonging as Black children grow into their cultural, ethnic, and racial identities.

      Participants will:

      • Learn about and explore ways in which cultivating strong racial identities in children matter and how this understanding benefits all children, families, and communities
      • Discuss strategies for nurturing strong cultural, ethnic, and racial identities in Black children when partnering with families, communities, and colleagues
      • Identify resources that promote strong cultural, ethnic, and racial identities in Black children when partnering with families, communities, and colleagues
        • This workshop is offered at the following times:

          • Tuesday, March 29, at 3:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM PT
          • Wednesday, March 30, at 3:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM PT
          • Thursday, March 31, at 3:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM PT

          Facilitator:

          • Eurnestine Brown, Ph.D., Director of Relational Equity and Belonging, Brazelton Touchpoints Center


          Supporting Father Involvement and Co-Parenting Across All Kinds of Differences 

          Research shows that when fathers become more involved in raising their children, and specifically when co-parents work as partners, all benefit. Are you looking for a way to support father engagement and co-parenting in your program? Come find out about the strategies, tools, and outcomes from the Supporting Father Involvement (SFI) Program an evidence-based parenting program designed for families that are culturally and economically diverse. 

          This workshop is offered at the following times:

          • Tuesday, March 29, at 3:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM PT
          • Wednesday, March 30, at 3:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM PT
          • Thursday, March 31, at 3:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM PT

          Facilitators:

          • Deutron Kebebew, BTC National Facilitator, SFI Facilitator
          • Ramona Villarreal-Padilla, BTC National Facilitator, SFI Facilitator


          Lifting Your Voice for Children: Strategies for Advocating for Policies in Support of Infants, Children, and Families

          As the pandemic continues its grip on communities and families, advocating to elected officials can feel like the last thing you have time for. At this divided and polarized time in our country’s history, heading into contentious midterm elections that will determine control of Congress, is it even worth it? Does talking to state or national legislators make any difference at all? Ironically, pandemic-driven changes have made elected officials and their staff more accessible to constituents than ever. Join Catriona Macdonald, a 25-year veteran of working Capitol Hill on behalf of young children and families, for this nuts-and-bolts workshop. We’ll talk about whether advocacy matters; finding the right people to talk to; setting up your meeting; preparing for your advocacy; and following up to make the voice of your community heard in policy decisions at the state and national level.

          This workshop is offered at the following times:

          • Tuesday, March 29, at 3:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM PT
          • Wednesday, March 30, at 3:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM PT
          • Thursday, March 31, at 3:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM PT

          Facilitator:

          • Catriona Macdonald, MPP, Founder and President of Linchpin Strategies, LLC, a Washington, DC, strategic consulting and government relations firm