Brazelton Touchpoints Center Announces New Partnership

Brazelton Touchpoints Center (BTC) is pleased to announce a partnership with California-based WestEd, a leader in improving learning and healthy development at all stages of life. BTC will deliver comprehensive professional development programming to early educators throughout the state of California. Following a competitive application process, First 5 California (F5CA), also known as the California Children and Families Commission, awarded WestEd a contract through which BTC will train more than 1,600 stakeholders in family engagement strategies, with a goal of building individual and organizational capacity to better serve children and families.

Drawing on more than 20 years of experience from its signature intensive family engagement program, Touchpoints, BTC will collaborate with WestEd to develop and deliver evidence-based training and resources that help early educators integrate proven family engagement strategies into their interactions with parents and families.  This training will enhance the capacity of early educators and organizations to build strong relationships with families, deepen their understanding of the issues facing young children and parents, and integrate innovative care and engagement strategies into their daily practice. In addition, by using a train-the-trainer model, the partnership will certify 125 family engagement trainers who will deliver ongoing professional development throughout California, further bolstering the long term impact of this project.

“Through this collaborative partnership, BTC and WestEd will catalyze and strengthen early education by building the skills of individual educators, while enhancing organizational capacity and creating systemic impact through new knowledge, evidence-based practices, and extensive support infrastructure such as virtual peer communities and an on-line resource library,” said Dr. Joshua Sparrow, Director of the Brazelton Touchpoints Center. “As a result, children and families across California will benefit from these investments in early education, creating transformational change in communities throughout the state.”  

About the Partners:

Brazelton Touchpoints Center

The Brazelton Touchpoints Center was founded in 1996 by T. Berry Brazelton, MD, and colleagues, and is based in the Division of Developmental Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital, a Harvard Medical School teaching hospital. A pioneer in the field of child development and pediatrics whose keen insights and observations fundamentally changed the way we understand and approach child development and family engagement, Dr. Brazelton’s work continues today, embodied in the Center that bears his name. Working together with families, providers, and communities, the Brazelton Touchpoints Center develops and applies knowledge of early childhood development to practice and policy through professional and organizational development, evaluation, advocacy and awareness, and serving as a resource for proven practices. Since 2010, BTC has been the home of the Office of Head Start and Office of Child Care National Center on Parent, Family, and Community Engagement. More information on our programs can be found at www.brazeltontouchpoints.org.

WestEd

As a nonpartisan, nonprofit research, development, and service agency, working in education and other communities throughout the United States and abroad, WestEd aims to improve educational and other important outcomes for children, youth and adults. More information about WestEd and its innovative work can be found online at www.wested.org.

ABOUT First 5 California

First 5 California was established in 1998 when voters passed Proposition 10, which taxes tobacco products to fund services for children ages 0 to 5 and their families. First 5 programs and resources are designed to educate and support teachers, parents, and caregivers in the critical role they play during a child’s first five years – to help California kids receive the best possible start in life and thrive. For more information, please visit www.ccfc.ca.gov.

 

Register Today!Fatherhood Connection Webinar Series, May 25-June 22, 2017

Fatherhood Connection Webinar Series, May 25-June 22, 2017

May 22, 2017 – Join the National Center on Parent, Family, and Community Engagement for the Fatherhood Connection Webinar Series. This three-part webinar series focuses on effective fatherhood engagement. It also supports program efforts to be more intentional about engaging fathers to promote children’s learning and development and strengthening the parent-child relationship.

 

Program Environment and Strong Family Partnerships

In this first webinar, consider what fathers experience when they walk into an early childhood program. What do they see, hear, and feel? Presenters will discuss relationship-based strategies and share effective ways to engage fathers. Find your starting point in making improvements to program environments.

 

Topics for the webinar include:

  • Making program environments more welcoming to fathers through the physical space and staff attitudes and behaviors
  • Applying relationship-based practices to support strong partnerships with fathers

 

Thursday, May 25, 2017

3-4 p.m. EDT

 

Join the Chat After the Webinar!

4–4:15 p.m. EST

 

Who Should Participate? 

This webinar will benefit an array of audiences, including: Head Start, Early Head Start, and child care directors, managers, and parent leaders; T/TA providers; and other early childhood leaders who support child and family progress.

 

How to Register

Space is limited. Select the link to register for the webinar and chat: https://events-na11.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1092484587/en/events/event/shared/1636273223/event_landing.html?sco-id=1636232324&_charset_=utf-8

 

 

Questions?

To learn more, please contact us at pfcewebinars@ecetta.info.

 

About NATIONAL CENTER ON PARENT, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

NCPFCE, jointly administered by the Office of Head Start (OHS) and the Office of Child Care (OCC), supports family well-being, effective family and community engagement, and children’s school readiness. The Center focuses on training and technical assistance and resource development for early childhood state systems/administrators and their networks; and early childhood programs and providers. It promotes staff-family relationship building practices that are culturally and linguistically responsive; integrated and systemic family engagement strategies that are outcomes-based; and consumer education, family leadership, family economic stability, and individualized support for families. Our partners include the Brazelton Touchpoints Center (lead), Child Care Aware of America, Center for the Study of Social Policy, and Child Trends.

The Brazelton Touchpoints Center Celebrates National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day and Mental Health Awareness Month!

Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day shines a national spotlight on the importance of caring for every child’s mental health from birth, which is essential to a child’s healthy development. The theme for 2017 is “Finding Help, Finding Hope.” The focus is on the importance of integrating behavioral health and primary care for children, youth, and young adults who experience mental or substance use disorders.

Through our professional development program offerings—Family Connections, Touchpoints, and the Newborn Behavioral Observations (NBO)—BTC empowers both “Help and Hope.”

Family Connections is an early childhood mental health consultation and professional staff development program of Boston Children’s Hospital that supports early childhood and home visiting programs in their outreach to families facing mental health challenges, particularly parental depression.

BTC also offers a blend of both Family Connections and the Brazelton Touchpoints approach to working with children and families to support social and emotional development and well-being and relationship building.

Newborn Behavioral Observations (NBO), provided through the Brazelton Institute, housed at BTC, supports children’s mental health from the day of birth.

Learn more about our professional development offerings, and visit our calendar for upcoming opportunities to participate.

 

Free Webinar: Engaging Families and Creating Trusting Partnerships to Improve Child and Family Outcomes

Enhancing Trusting Partnerships at the Systems and Practice Levels: 
Reciprocal Opportunities for Professionals and Families

 

Thursday, April 20, 2017
3:004:00 pm EDT

 

Register Online Now!

 
Join the Early Childhood Technical Assistance (ECTA) Center and the Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy) for the second session in a four-part webinar series. The series aims to help early intervention (EI) and early childhood special education (ECSE) systems leaders build staff capacity and work with families to develop trusting partnerships. In the second session, staff from ECTA, DaSy, and guest presenters will focus on the nature of trusting partnerships among professionals and families. This series will run monthly through June 2017.

 

Topics for the webinar include:

  • The six research-based partnership principles
  • A review of the practices that professionals and families should demonstrate when implementing the principles
  • Tools for measuring partnerships and family engagement

 

Presenters:

  • Staff from the National Center on Parent, Family, and Community Engagement
  • Early Childhood Partners from Iowa

 

Who Should Participate? 
This webinar will benefit an array of audiences, including: EI/ECSE state staff (e.g., Part C and 619 coordinators, professional development and technical assistance staff), EI/ECSE family leaders, and IDEA State Interagency Coordinating Council and State Advisory Panel representatives; and Head Start, Early Head Start, and child care national and state leaders; and other early childhood leaders and stakeholders committed to strengthening family-staff collaboration in programs that serve young children with developmental delays and disabilities, and their families.

 

How to Register
Select the link to register: https://unc.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1XO0PTKdaLPnEu9

 

Questions
To learn more, please contact the Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center at ectacenter@unc.edu or call 919-962-2001.

 

Webinar: Getting to the Bottom Line of Family Engagement

Engaging Families and Creating Trusting Partnerships to Improve Child and Family Outcomes: Getting to the Bottom Line of Family Engagement

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

34 p.m. EDT

Register Online Now!

 

Join the Early Childhood Technical Assistance (ECTA) Center and the Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy) for the first session in a four-part webinar series. The series aims to help early intervention (EI) and early childhood special education (ECSE) systems leaders build staff capacity and work with families to develop trusting partnerships. In the first session, staff from ECTA, DaSy, and guest presenters will discuss family engagement at the systems level. This series will run monthly through June 2017.

 

Topics for the webinar include:

  • The meaning of family engagement
  • A review of key policies, frameworks, and the DEC Recommended Practices on family engagement
  • The essential role of systems supports for ensuring local implementation of effective family engagement practices

 

Presenters:

  • Christina Kasprzak, ECTA Center, DaSy Center
  • Ann Turnbull, University of Kansas (retired), University of North Carolina (adjunct)
  • Rud Turnbull, University of Kansas (retired), University of North Carolina (adjunct)
  • Joshua Sparrow, MD, National Center on Parent, Family, and Community Engagement (NCPFCE)

 

Who Should Participate? 

This webinar will benefit an array of audiences, including: EI/ECSE state staff (e.g., Part C and 619 coordinators, professional development and technical assistance staff), EI/ECSE family leaders, and IDEA State Interagency Coordinating Council and State Advisory Panel representatives; and Head Start, Early Head Start, and child care national and state leaders; and other early childhood leaders and stakeholders committed to strengthening family-staff collaboration in programs that serve young children with developmental delays and disabilities, and their families.

 

How to Register

Select the link to register: https://unc.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6nxy4ZCLU49GNet

 

Questions
To learn more, please contact the Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center at ectacenter@unc.edu or call 919-962-2001.

Debra Sosin, LICSW, Receives Distinguished Alumni Award

We are proud to announce that Debra Sosin, LICSW, project director for Family Connections, has received the Distinguished Alumni of the Year award from the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work. The award was presented at the Diversity + Justice and Alumni Awards Conference at Boston College on Friday, January 27, 2017.

You can learn more about the award here.

2016 in Review – NBO and NBAS Achievements and Milestones

The Brazelton Institute, under the direction of J. Kevin Nugent, PhD, has published a report entitled “2016 in Review – NBO and NBAS Achievements and Milestones.”

The report can be read here.

Huffington Post: Economic Medicine For Lifelong Health

In the 60 years since I (TBB) first started practicing pediatrics, medical science has made many advances possible. Today’s doctors have access to new vaccines and surgical procedures that we could only dream of when I started out.

Yet science has also revealed that raising healthy children requires more than the latest medical treatments. When children grow up in poverty — as over one out of every six in the United States do (Wimer, Fox, Garfinkel, Kaushal, and Waldfogel, 2013) — the experience can have dire consequences.

Babies born poor face lifelong consequences for health, mental health, and success in school and in life. Asthma, obesity, diabetes, and learning disabilities are just some of the challenges that children who grow up poor are more likely to face (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 2015). And they are far more likely to remain poor as adults (see for instance, Greenstone, Looney, Patashnik, and Yu, 2013). This means that their babies, too, are at higher risk of being born — and dying — poor.

The challenges that children living in poverty face are profound and unfair. Americans of every stripe know that babies don’t choose the circumstances they are born into. And they don’t choose the lifelong consequences of childhood poverty either.

Read the rest of the article here. 

Brazelton Touchpoints Center National Forum and 20th Anniversary Video Premiere

More than 150 people from all over the U.S. gathered in Providence for two days to reflect on our past and envision our future at the Brazelton Touchpoints Center 2016 National Forum. Most were certified Brazelton Touchpoints trainers, but the group included representatives from a wide range of disciplines, and professional and family roles. Among many others:

  • The founding director of an Oakland program for recently incarcerated fathers, who not only applies Brazelton Touchpoints principles and practices in his daily work but spreads them to other family-facing professionals and organizers in his community
  • A Washington DC pediatrician who is working to ensure that her examining rooms reflect her patients’ diverse heritages, embedding Touchpoints (including theNewborn Behavioral Observations) into her practice.
  • Child welfare workers from Palm Beach County who showed the sustainability of the Touchpoints strategies, tools, and principles. Not only have they fully integrated Touchpoints into their work, they are recruiting with the Touchpoints approach in mind and passing it on to their new co-workers.
  • A mom and dad from one of the newest sites—the Laguna Pueblo—who have become leaders in their community and eagerly participated in the Forum sessions.
  • The director of family engagement forthe Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Campaign for Grade Level Reading, who is exploring bringing Touchpoints to the 240 cities in their network!

Together attendees delved deeply into the core principles and practices of Brazelton Touchpoints, exploring everything from exercises used in the initial training sessions in 1996 to what we’ve learned about impact and what it takes to make sustainable change in organizations, communities, and systems.

At our 20th Anniversary celebration Friday evening, the Brazelton Touchpoints Center Lifetime Contribution Award was presented to “someone who has been there since the beginning,” whose grace, generosity, commitment, and steadying hand shaped our work and our organization—the beloved and much missed Chrissy Brazelton. Two of Dr. Brazelton’s daughters accepted the award on their mother’s behalf. Reception guests then watched an inspirational video produced by Hank O’Karma that captured the breadth and impact of the tools, programs, research base, and network that BTC has built over the past 20 years.

On Saturday, Joshua Sparrow spoke powerfully about the Center’s vision for the future. Executive Director Jane Tewksbury closed the conference by leading everyone in a word cloud exercise. She asked us to share our feelings in a single word.  Collectively, we left feeling inspired, refreshed, reenergized, and feliz (happy), but also, in Touchpoints lingo, “disorganized” and challenged to process and apply all that we have learned in order to take Touchpoints to the next level.

Watch the 20th Anniversary Video here!

U.S. Department of Education Hosting a Google Hangout on Early STEM on Wednesday, July 13

The U.S. Department of Education is hosting a Google Hangout as a follow-up to the White House’s symposium on Early STEM. Tune in on Wednesday, July 13 at 3:00 PM EDT for a discussion on using technology to support early STEM learning and follow along on twitter using #STEMStartsEarly

You can register for the “Using Technology to Support Early STEM” Google Hangout here!