The 2018 National Forum: Celebrate the Legacy, Empower the Future a Success!

Over three days in April in Newton, Massachusetts, BTC held its 2018 National Forum: Celebrate the Legacy, Empower the Future.

On Monday, April 23rd more than 250 practitioners, educators, and family-facing professionals gathered for the Dr. T. Berry Brazelton Symposium and Celebration. The Symposium featured speakers working on the front lines of social justice with children and families in communities all across the country, and who are, in their own ways, carrying forward Dr. Brazelton’s legacy.

The day began with a traditional native blessing and the reading of a poem to honor and remember Dr. Brazelton. Tarajean Yazzie-Mintz of the American Indian College Fund led off with a dynamic talk about the quest for equity in Indigenous early childhood opportunities, with Sandra Gutierrez of Abriendo Puertas/Opening Doors following with a focus on empowered parents as agents of change. Later that afternoon, Dr. Renee Boynton-Jarrett of Boston Medical Center inspired the crowd with the power of networks to achieve shared community objectives, while Geoffrey Canada of the Harlem Children’s Zone provided powerful testimony to what’s required and what’s gained by investing in the strength and resiliency of communities.

Before lunch, a delegation representing Massachusetts Senator Edward J. Markey paid tribute to Dr. Brazelton for his lifetime of accomplishments to American society, and presented a flag that had flown over the US Capitol building to Dr. Brazelton’s children and grandchildren – what a true honor!

During Monday evening, a celebration of Dr. Brazelton’s life and legacy was held, where memories were shared, toasts were made, and emotions flowed. Among the speakers were Sandra Fenwick, the CEO of Boston Children’s Hospital, Jeri Robinson, Vice President for Early Childhood Initiatives at the Boston Children’s Museum, and Ann Linehan, Deputy Director of the Office of Head Start. A video paying tribute to Dr. Brazelton was shown, and the evening closed with a true homage to Dr. Brazelton as the crowd indulged in vanilla ice cream and caramel sauce, his absolute favorite!

On Tuesday, April 24th, the BTC Site Network held a professional development day, with nearly 100 attendees from Touchpoints Sites across the country and the world sharing strategies and solutions to family-engagement and unlocking the strengths of parents and caregivers to support their children’s healthy development. That afternoon, Ann Stadtler, DNP, RN, CPNP, who retired in December 2017, was celebrated and honored for her contributions to the BTC Site Network and children and families everywhere. To honor Ann’s legacy, BTC has launched the Ann Stadtler Fund for Professional Development, which will raise money to support professional development opportunities for providers and sites across the country. To read a tribute to Ann that appeared in our last newsletter, click here.

Closing out the 2018 National Forum was the BTC Tribal Touchpoints Network’s annual retreat on Wednesday, April 25th, which this year brought together more than 20 tribal leaders, educators and practitioners for a day of collaboration, networking, and cross-fertilization of ideas, solutions, and approaches to shared challenges and issues.

Thank you to everyone who attended the 2018 National Forum and all those who helped make it possible, including BTC’s generous sponsors. The Forum was an astounding tribute to the life and work of Dr. T. Berry Brazelton, and a true catalyst for carrying forward his legacy to the next generation and beyond!

In Memoriam: T. Berry Brazelton, MD, 1918 – 2018

It is with deep sadness that we share the news that our esteemed colleague and beloved friend and mentor, T. Berry Brazelton, MD, passed away this morning, March 13, 2018. The world has lost a true champion for babies, young children, and families.

Dr. Brazelton, Professor of Pediatrics Emeritus at Harvard Medical School, was one of the most influential scientists, clinicians, and advocates in pediatrics and child development of the modern era. Since founding the Brazelton Touchpoints Center in 1996 to carry on his transformational work, he remained actively engaged in leading the Center until his death.

There are many ways to honor, celebrate, and memorialize Dr. Brazelton:

Winter Newsletter February 2018

Click here for larger format!

Register Today!Fatherhood Connection Webinar Series, May 25-June 22, 2017

Fatherhood Connection Webinar Series, May 25-June 22, 2017

May 22, 2017 – Join the National Center on Parent, Family, and Community Engagement for the Fatherhood Connection Webinar Series. This three-part webinar series focuses on effective fatherhood engagement. It also supports program efforts to be more intentional about engaging fathers to promote children’s learning and development and strengthening the parent-child relationship.

 

Program Environment and Strong Family Partnerships

In this first webinar, consider what fathers experience when they walk into an early childhood program. What do they see, hear, and feel? Presenters will discuss relationship-based strategies and share effective ways to engage fathers. Find your starting point in making improvements to program environments.

 

Topics for the webinar include:

  • Making program environments more welcoming to fathers through the physical space and staff attitudes and behaviors
  • Applying relationship-based practices to support strong partnerships with fathers

 

Thursday, May 25, 2017

3-4 p.m. EDT

 

Join the Chat After the Webinar!

4–4:15 p.m. EST

 

Who Should Participate? 

This webinar will benefit an array of audiences, including: Head Start, Early Head Start, and child care directors, managers, and parent leaders; T/TA providers; and other early childhood leaders who support child and family progress.

 

How to Register

Space is limited. Select the link to register for the webinar and chat: https://events-na11.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1092484587/en/events/event/shared/1636273223/event_landing.html?sco-id=1636232324&_charset_=utf-8

 

 

Questions?

To learn more, please contact us at pfcewebinars@ecetta.info.

 

About NATIONAL CENTER ON PARENT, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

NCPFCE, jointly administered by the Office of Head Start (OHS) and the Office of Child Care (OCC), supports family well-being, effective family and community engagement, and children’s school readiness. The Center focuses on training and technical assistance and resource development for early childhood state systems/administrators and their networks; and early childhood programs and providers. It promotes staff-family relationship building practices that are culturally and linguistically responsive; integrated and systemic family engagement strategies that are outcomes-based; and consumer education, family leadership, family economic stability, and individualized support for families. Our partners include the Brazelton Touchpoints Center (lead), Child Care Aware of America, Center for the Study of Social Policy, and Child Trends.

Free Webinar: Engaging Families and Creating Trusting Partnerships to Improve Child and Family Outcomes

Enhancing Trusting Partnerships at the Systems and Practice Levels: 
Reciprocal Opportunities for Professionals and Families

 

Thursday, April 20, 2017
3:004:00 pm EDT

 

Register Online Now!

Join the Early Childhood Technical Assistance (ECTA) Center and the Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy) for the second session in a four-part webinar series. The series aims to help early intervention (EI) and early childhood special education (ECSE) systems leaders build staff capacity and work with families to develop trusting partnerships. In the second session, staff from ECTA, DaSy, and guest presenters will focus on the nature of trusting partnerships among professionals and families. This series will run monthly through June 2017.

 

Topics for the webinar include:

  • The six research-based partnership principles
  • A review of the practices that professionals and families should demonstrate when implementing the principles
  • Tools for measuring partnerships and family engagement

 

Presenters:

  • Staff from the National Center on Parent, Family, and Community Engagement
  • Early Childhood Partners from Iowa

 

Who Should Participate?
This webinar will benefit an array of audiences, including: EI/ECSE state staff (e.g., Part C and 619 coordinators, professional development and technical assistance staff), EI/ECSE family leaders, and IDEA State Interagency Coordinating Council and State Advisory Panel representatives; and Head Start, Early Head Start, and child care national and state leaders; and other early childhood leaders and stakeholders committed to strengthening family-staff collaboration in programs that serve young children with developmental delays and disabilities, and their families.

 

How to Register
Select the link to register: https://unc.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1XO0PTKdaLPnEu9

 

Questions
To learn more, please contact the Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center at ectacenter@unc.edu or call 919-962-2001.

 

Webinar: Getting to the Bottom Line of Family Engagement

Engaging Families and Creating Trusting Partnerships to Improve Child and Family Outcomes: Getting to the Bottom Line of Family Engagement

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

34 p.m. EDT

Register Online Now!

 

Join the Early Childhood Technical Assistance (ECTA) Center and the Center for IDEA Early Childhood Data Systems (DaSy) for the first session in a four-part webinar series. The series aims to help early intervention (EI) and early childhood special education (ECSE) systems leaders build staff capacity and work with families to develop trusting partnerships. In the first session, staff from ECTA, DaSy, and guest presenters will discuss family engagement at the systems level. This series will run monthly through June 2017.

 

Topics for the webinar include:

  • The meaning of family engagement
  • A review of key policies, frameworks, and the DEC Recommended Practices on family engagement
  • The essential role of systems supports for ensuring local implementation of effective family engagement practices

 

Presenters:

  • Christina Kasprzak, ECTA Center, DaSy Center
  • Ann Turnbull, University of Kansas (retired), University of North Carolina (adjunct)
  • Rud Turnbull, University of Kansas (retired), University of North Carolina (adjunct)
  • Joshua Sparrow, MD, National Center on Parent, Family, and Community Engagement (NCPFCE)

 

Who Should Participate?

This webinar will benefit an array of audiences, including: EI/ECSE state staff (e.g., Part C and 619 coordinators, professional development and technical assistance staff), EI/ECSE family leaders, and IDEA State Interagency Coordinating Council and State Advisory Panel representatives; and Head Start, Early Head Start, and child care national and state leaders; and other early childhood leaders and stakeholders committed to strengthening family-staff collaboration in programs that serve young children with developmental delays and disabilities, and their families.

 

How to Register

Select the link to register: https://unc.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6nxy4ZCLU49GNet

 

Questions
To learn more, please contact the Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center at ectacenter@unc.edu or call 919-962-2001.

Debra Sosin, LICSW, Receives Distinguished Alumni Award

We are proud to announce that Debra Sosin, LICSW, project director for Family Connections, has received the Distinguished Alumni of the Year award from the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work. The award was presented at the Diversity + Justice and Alumni Awards Conference at Boston College on Friday, January 27, 2017.

You can learn more about the award here.

2016 in Review – NBO and NBAS Achievements and Milestones

The Brazelton Institute, under the direction of J. Kevin Nugent, PhD, has published a report entitled “2016 in Review – NBO and NBAS Achievements and Milestones.”

The report can be read here.

Huffington Post: Economic Medicine For Lifelong Health

In the 60 years since I (TBB) first started practicing pediatrics, medical science has made many advances possible. Today’s doctors have access to new vaccines and surgical procedures that we could only dream of when I started out.

Yet science has also revealed that raising healthy children requires more than the latest medical treatments. When children grow up in poverty — as over one out of every six in the United States do (Wimer, Fox, Garfinkel, Kaushal, and Waldfogel, 2013) — the experience can have dire consequences.

Babies born poor face lifelong consequences for health, mental health, and success in school and in life. Asthma, obesity, diabetes, and learning disabilities are just some of the challenges that children who grow up poor are more likely to face (Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 2015). And they are far more likely to remain poor as adults (see for instance, Greenstone, Looney, Patashnik, and Yu, 2013). This means that their babies, too, are at higher risk of being born — and dying — poor.

The challenges that children living in poverty face are profound and unfair. Americans of every stripe know that babies don’t choose the circumstances they are born into. And they don’t choose the lifelong consequences of childhood poverty either.

Read the rest of the article here. 

U.S. Department of Education Hosting a Google Hangout on Early STEM on Wednesday, July 13

The U.S. Department of Education is hosting a Google Hangout as a follow-up to the White House’s symposium on Early STEM. Tune in on Wednesday, July 13 at 3:00 PM EDT for a discussion on using technology to support early STEM learning and follow along on twitter using #STEMStartsEarly

You can register for the “Using Technology to Support Early STEM” Google Hangout here!